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FIU SCIS's Invited Lecture Series presents Dr. Frank Krueger speaking on the topic of "Towards a NeuroPsychoEconomics Model of Interpersonal Trust"

This is a past event.

Tuesday, September 11, 2018 at 2:00pm to 3:30pm

CASE - Computing, Arts, Sciences & Education, 241
11200 SW 8th ST 33199, Computing, Arts, Sciences & Education Miami, Florida 33199

FIU SCIS's Invited Lecture Series presents Dr. Frank Krueger speaking on the topic of "Towards a NeuroPsychoEconomics Model of Interpersonal Trust".

Abstract
Trust pervades nearly every social aspect of our daily lives and penetrates all human social interactions from interpersonal, institutional, and intercultural relationships. Previous research in the field of neuroeconomics has helped to gain a deeper understanding of the neuropsychoeconomics (NPE) signatures of trust by combining complementary methodologies from economics, psychology, and neuroscience. However, an overarching NPE model of interpersonal trust that integrates separate findings under a conceptual framework is still lacking. In this talk, I will sketch out an integrative NPE model that describes how interpersonal trust emerges over time. Also, I will point out caveats of the current research approach in studying the neuropsychology of trust and discuss outstanding questions that can guide future transdisciplinary investigations in better understanding and ultimately facilitating interpersonal trust in society.

Bio
Dr. Frank Krueger is Associate Professor of Systems Social Neuroscience at the School of Systems Biology at George Mason University. He is Chief of the Social Cognition & Interaction: Functionalism & Immersion (SCI:FI) Lab and Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Neuroeconomics at the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study. As a psychologist and neuroscientist, Dr. Krueger is interested in understanding the psychological functions (i.e., why they exist and work) and the proximate neurobiological mechanisms (i.e., how they work) of social cognition (e.g., beliefs, schemata) and social interactions (e.g., trust, cooperation), combining methods from behavioral economics, social psychology, and social neuroscience.

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