Tag: FIUMBUS

Miami Beach Urban Studios New Music Miami ISCM Festival: Aurora Borealist Duo

Aurora Borealist duo concert

New Music Miami ISCM Festival: Aurora Borealist Duo

Members of the Aurora Borealis Duo, soprano Tiffany Du Muchelle and percussionist Steve Solook, present new works by Chen-Hui Jen and Jacob Sudol along with works by Brian Christian and Katharina Rosenberg.

Aurora Borealis was founded in 2004 when percussionist Stephen Solook and soprano Tiffany Du Mouchelle were asked to collaborate in a performance of Roberto Sierra’s Invocationes for voice and percussion at the Mannes College in NYC. Since that time, Aurora Borealis has premiered over 25 duo and chamber works for voice and percussion. The works commissioned by Aurora Borealis focus on expanding the repertoire of voice and percussion composition, specifically in exploring new dimensions within the relationship between these two instruments. When the duo first began to work together, much of their repertoire came from neo-classical and neo-romantic musical traditions.

It soon became clear that these traditions tend to favor the voice as a melodic instrument and percussion more in as accompaniment. The duo realized that for Aurora Borealis to be a true “duo” that the nature of their repertoire must then support each instrument equally. This realization has led Du Mouchelle and Solook into close relationships with many American composers, primarily through commissioning new works. Their first commission was a work by Bruce Adolphe titled Da BooDa Boo, structured upon made up nonsensical text, plays with the concept of jazz scat. In this respect, the marimba and voice speak together without the limitations of literal meaning.

Last season Aurora Borealis performed the West Coast Premiere of Reynolds’ Justice, a chamber opera for soprano, percussionist, actress and computer musician. Reynolds builds a three-dimensional model of the heroine Clytemnestra, where soprano, actress and percussion melt together to form the layers of her distressed mind. Justice explored the relationship of voice and percussion from an intuitive emotional standpoint, while exploring the sonic relationship between percussive instrumentation and percussive speech. The most recent composer/ensemble collaboration of Aurora Borealis explores a new sonic relationship between voice and percussion. In Ignota, composer Bryan Christian and computer music engineer William Brent have developed an entirely new language, based upon a spectral analysis of the formants of both instruments, which was encoded in new software developed by Dr. Brent. This new language, one that voice and percussion can speak with equal ease and clarity, offers the duo an exciting new mode of conversation. Their performances have taken them throughout the world, from New York to Los Angeles, Egypt, Cameroon, and even the remote villages of Papua New Guinea. Upcoming engagements include the World Premiere of Ignota.

This programming was made possible with the support of the Alice M. Ditson Fund.

Students and guests are invited to the free composers forum with our performers on February 3rd at 12:00 PM (same location).

To learn more about the New Music Miami ISCM Festival, click here.

Miami Beach Urban Studios Open Public Rehearsal: Amernet String Quartet

Conservatory strings quartet shoot at my mom's house - Franz Fel

Open Public Rehearsal: Amernet String Quartet

Come visit the Urban Studios and listen to the Amernet string quartet practice 10:30am-1:30pm

Amernet is back with a new sound, a fresh approach and an irresistible energy!

The Amernet String Quartet has garnered recognition as one of today’s  exceptional string quartets and are Ensemble-in-Residence at Florida International University in Miami.  Their sound has been called “complex” but with an “old world flavor.” Strad Magazine described the Amernet as “…a group of exceptional technical ability.”

The Amernet is joined this season by second violinist Tomas Cotik and forges ahead with a newly formed sound with the release of a new CD called Dissenting Voices on New Focus Recordings featuring rarely-heard works by Sofia Gubaidulina, Shostakovich, and Mieczysław Weinberg, one of the most important recent re-discoveries and considered by many the third of the great Soviet composers, alongside Prokofiev and Shostakovich.

At last season’s Soluna Festival, under the auspices of the Dallas Symphony, the following was said of the group:  [Misha] “Vitenson is an aggressive violinist who generates a full sound and plays with laser focus, nearly perfect intonation and amazing accuracy.  A natural born leader, he probably would chaff in the second violin chair.  Klotz is probably the best violist you will ever hear.  He has a huge sound that can match the cello or the violin, depending on the texture of the music. His solo passages are stunning.  Calloway has his work cut out for him, playing in such an assertive quartet, but he always rises to the occasion. He offers a firm grounding, and is the underpinning for the remarkable intonation of the group.  However, he can soar above the fray when the music requires it.”  -Theater Jones

Their performance at the Kennedy Center’s Fortas Chamber Music Series at the Terrace Theater yielded the following comments from the Washington Post:  [“The Amernet’s performance of Beethoven op. 95] was buoyed by the pull of irresistible momentum even in the second movement, in which cellist Jason Calloway’s beautifully weighted falling scale proceeded with stately majesty.  You had a feeling that the four musicians had decided to throw care to the winds and just go for it.  The Amernet…has a whole fistful of recently written pieces in its repertoire, many of which the quartet commissioned.  But a concert of Haydn, Beethoven and Franck is not to be sneezed at…when played as well and with as much attention to style and proportion as this one was.  The group adopted a warm, woody tone for their reading of Haydn’s Quartet in F minor, Op. 20, No. 5, and a richly lush, almost orchestral delivery for the Franck Piano Quintet. [with Pianist James Tocco]. Their Haydn maintained an intimate, Baroque-like balance and transparency while their Franck ebbed and flowed in the indulgence of that work’s romanticism, and the players seemed equally at home in both of these very different idioms.

The Amernet’s performance schedule has taken the quartet across the Americas and to Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.  They have collaborated with many of today’s most prominent artists and ensembles including the Tokyo and Ying quartets as well as Shmuel Ashkenasi, Robert deMaine, Roberto Diaz, Gary Hoffman, Ida Kavafian, Anthony McGill, Sherrill Milnes and Michael Tree.

Internationally, the quartet has appeared at major festivals around the world, including Cervantino, San Miguel de Allende, Aviv (Israel), and Colima (Mexico), while in Germany a critic commented that their playing was “fascinating, with flawless intonation, extraordinary beauty of sound, virtuosic brilliance and homogeneity of ensemble.”  (Nürnberger Nachrichten).  The Amernet’s U.S. engagements have included the Kennedy Center, the Tilles Center, Caramoor, the Great Lakes Festival, Newport, Friends of Chamber Music in Arizona and Friends of Chamber Music in Syracuse, LPR in New York City, Chamber Music Society of Louisville, Music on the Edge in Pittsburgh, the University of Maine – Collins Center, and Market Square Concerts.  The Amernet has also appeared as quartet soloist with the Cincinnati Symphony and Alan Gilbert.  Earlier in their career, the Amernet won the gold medal at the Tokyo International Music Competition before being named first prize winners of the prestigious Banff International String Quartet Competition.

Prior to their current position at Florida International University, the Amernet held posts as Corbett String Quartet-in-Residence at Northern Kentucky University and at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.  Additionally, the ensemble served as the Ernst Stiefel Quartet-in-Residence at the Caramoor Center for the Arts.

In its frequent touring, the Amernet has conducted workshops and master classes in Buffalo, Los Angeles, Memphis, and New Orleans as well as visiting residencies at colleges and universities including Columbia, Gettysburg, Penn State, Princeton, Western Illinois, and Wiliams and abroad in Colombia, Israel, Mexico, and Serbia.  The Amernet String Quartet has received grants from the Corbett Foundation, the Greater Cincinnati Foundation, the LaSalle Foundation, the Fine Arts Fund, the Cincinnati Chamber Music Society, and the Amernet Society for school outreach projects, the commissioning of new chamber music works, and their concert and conversation series.  The group was the recipient of a Chamber Music Rural Residency Award during which they divided their time among the communities of Johnstown, Somerset, and Indiana, Pennsylvania.

The Amernet has always been committed to the music of our time, and now under the moniker AmerneXt, the Amernet is adopting some of the great works of the late 20th and 21st centuries in the context of earlier and traditional music.  Working closely with some of today’s leading composers, such as John Corigliano, Orlando Garcia, John Harbison, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Fredrick Kaufman, Bernard Rands, Gerhard Samuel, Morton Subotnick, Dmitri Tymoczko, and Chinary Ung, the group has taken on a new attitude, with music by Kurtag, Gubaidulina, Michael Gordon, and some of the fresh new voices of composers under 40.

For more information on the Amernet String Quartet click, HERE.

Miami Beach Urban Studios Viola Masterclass with Wesley Collins of the Cleveland Orchestra

Wesley-Collins-Master-Class UPDATE JANUARY

Masterclass with Wesley Collins, Principal Viola of The Cleveland Orchestra

About Wesley Collins
Wesley Collins joined the viola section of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO) in the fall of 2012 and became third-chair viola in November 2014.  Before joining the BSO he had been a member of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, 2008-12.
Mr. Collins completed his bachelor of music degree at the Cleveland Institute of Music in May 2007, where he was a student of Robert Vernon.  While in Cleveland, he played as a substitute with The Cleveland Orchestra, played in the Canton Symphony Orchestra, Cleveland Chamber Symphony, and City Music Cleveland, and was assistant principal violist with the Akron Symphony Orchestra.  His summer activities have included the Tanglewood Music Center, Sarasota Music Festival, Encore School for Strings, and the Pacific Music Festival.
Born December 17, 1984 and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, Mr. Collins began studying violin with his mother, Sandy, at the age of four.  He also played trumpet under the instruction of his father, Philip Collins, former principal trumpet of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.  He later switched to viola under the guidance and inspiration of Michael Klotz, violist of the Amernet String Quartet.

This masterclass has been organized by the School of Music and Michael Klotz Violist, of the Amernet String Quartet and Senior Instructor of Viola and Chamber Music for FIU. www.michaelklotzmusic.com

Miami Beach Urban Studios Open Public Rehearsal: Amernet String Quartet

Conservatory strings quartet shoot at my mom's house - Franz Fel

Open Public Rehearsal: Amernet String Quartet

Come visit the Urban Studios and listen to the Amernet string quartet practice 10:30am-1:30pm

Amernet is back with a new sound, a fresh approach and an irresistible energy!

The Amernet String Quartet has garnered recognition as one of today’s  exceptional string quartets and are Ensemble-in-Residence at Florida International University in Miami.  Their sound has been called “complex” but with an “old world flavor.” Strad Magazine described the Amernet as “…a group of exceptional technical ability.”

The Amernet is joined this season by second violinist Tomas Cotik and forges ahead with a newly formed sound with the release of a new CD called Dissenting Voices on New Focus Recordings featuring rarely-heard works by Sofia Gubaidulina, Shostakovich, and Mieczysław Weinberg, one of the most important recent re-discoveries and considered by many the third of the great Soviet composers, alongside Prokofiev and Shostakovich.

At last season’s Soluna Festival, under the auspices of the Dallas Symphony, the following was said of the group:  [Misha] “Vitenson is an aggressive violinist who generates a full sound and plays with laser focus, nearly perfect intonation and amazing accuracy.  A natural born leader, he probably would chaff in the second violin chair.  Klotz is probably the best violist you will ever hear.  He has a huge sound that can match the cello or the violin, depending on the texture of the music. His solo passages are stunning.  Calloway has his work cut out for him, playing in such an assertive quartet, but he always rises to the occasion. He offers a firm grounding, and is the underpinning for the remarkable intonation of the group.  However, he can soar above the fray when the music requires it.”  -Theater Jones

Their performance at the Kennedy Center’s Fortas Chamber Music Series at the Terrace Theater yielded the following comments from the Washington Post:  [“The Amernet’s performance of Beethoven op. 95] was buoyed by the pull of irresistible momentum even in the second movement, in which cellist Jason Calloway’s beautifully weighted falling scale proceeded with stately majesty.  You had a feeling that the four musicians had decided to throw care to the winds and just go for it.  The Amernet…has a whole fistful of recently written pieces in its repertoire, many of which the quartet commissioned.  But a concert of Haydn, Beethoven and Franck is not to be sneezed at…when played as well and with as much attention to style and proportion as this one was.  The group adopted a warm, woody tone for their reading of Haydn’s Quartet in F minor, Op. 20, No. 5, and a richly lush, almost orchestral delivery for the Franck Piano Quintet. [with Pianist James Tocco]. Their Haydn maintained an intimate, Baroque-like balance and transparency while their Franck ebbed and flowed in the indulgence of that work’s romanticism, and the players seemed equally at home in both of these very different idioms.

The Amernet’s performance schedule has taken the quartet across the Americas and to Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.  They have collaborated with many of today’s most prominent artists and ensembles including the Tokyo and Ying quartets as well as Shmuel Ashkenasi, Robert deMaine, Roberto Diaz, Gary Hoffman, Ida Kavafian, Anthony McGill, Sherrill Milnes and Michael Tree.

Internationally, the quartet has appeared at major festivals around the world, including Cervantino, San Miguel de Allende, Aviv (Israel), and Colima (Mexico), while in Germany a critic commented that their playing was “fascinating, with flawless intonation, extraordinary beauty of sound, virtuosic brilliance and homogeneity of ensemble.”  (Nürnberger Nachrichten).  The Amernet’s U.S. engagements have included the Kennedy Center, the Tilles Center, Caramoor, the Great Lakes Festival, Newport, Friends of Chamber Music in Arizona and Friends of Chamber Music in Syracuse, LPR in New York City, Chamber Music Society of Louisville, Music on the Edge in Pittsburgh, the University of Maine – Collins Center, and Market Square Concerts.  The Amernet has also appeared as quartet soloist with the Cincinnati Symphony and Alan Gilbert.  Earlier in their career, the Amernet won the gold medal at the Tokyo International Music Competition before being named first prize winners of the prestigious Banff International String Quartet Competition.

Prior to their current position at Florida International University, the Amernet held posts as Corbett String Quartet-in-Residence at Northern Kentucky University and at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.  Additionally, the ensemble served as the Ernst Stiefel Quartet-in-Residence at the Caramoor Center for the Arts.

In its frequent touring, the Amernet has conducted workshops and master classes in Buffalo, Los Angeles, Memphis, and New Orleans as well as visiting residencies at colleges and universities including Columbia, Gettysburg, Penn State, Princeton, Western Illinois, and Wiliams and abroad in Colombia, Israel, Mexico, and Serbia.  The Amernet String Quartet has received grants from the Corbett Foundation, the Greater Cincinnati Foundation, the LaSalle Foundation, the Fine Arts Fund, the Cincinnati Chamber Music Society, and the Amernet Society for school outreach projects, the commissioning of new chamber music works, and their concert and conversation series.  The group was the recipient of a Chamber Music Rural Residency Award during which they divided their time among the communities of Johnstown, Somerset, and Indiana, Pennsylvania.

The Amernet has always been committed to the music of our time, and now under the moniker AmerneXt, the Amernet is adopting some of the great works of the late 20th and 21st centuries in the context of earlier and traditional music.  Working closely with some of today’s leading composers, such as John Corigliano, Orlando Garcia, John Harbison, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Fredrick Kaufman, Bernard Rands, Gerhard Samuel, Morton Subotnick, Dmitri Tymoczko, and Chinary Ung, the group has taken on a new attitude, with music by Kurtag, Gubaidulina, Michael Gordon, and some of the fresh new voices of composers under 40.

For more information on the Amernet String Quartet click, HERE.

Miami Beach Urban Studios New Music Miami ISCM Festival Calloway Sudol Duo “Works for Cello Electronics”

Calloway Sudol

New Music Miami ISCM Festival

Calloway Sudol Duo “Works for Cello Electronics”

An interdisciplinary event that explores the relationships between the cello, 3-D printed instruments, architecture, new technologies, and sound. Featuring cellist Jason Calloway with music by Jacob Sudol, and instruments by the MONAD Studio (Eric Goldemberg and Veronica Zalcberg). Directed by FIU Composer-in-Residence Orlando Jacinto Garcia.

Students and guests are invited to the free composers forum with our guests on January 27 at 12:00 PM (same location).

To learn more about the New Music Miami ISCM Festival, click here.

Miami Beach Urban Studios Open Public Rehearsal: Amernet String Quartet

Conservatory strings quartet shoot at my mom's house - Franz Fel

Open Public Rehearsal: Amernet String Quartet

Come visit the Urban Studios and listen to the Amernet string quartet practice 10:30am-1:30pm

Amernet is back with a new sound, a fresh approach and an irresistible energy!

The Amernet String Quartet has garnered recognition as one of today’s  exceptional string quartets and are Ensemble-in-Residence at Florida International University in Miami.  Their sound has been called “complex” but with an “old world flavor.” Strad Magazine described the Amernet as “…a group of exceptional technical ability.”

The Amernet is joined this season by second violinist Tomas Cotik and forges ahead with a newly formed sound with the release of a new CD called Dissenting Voices on New Focus Recordings featuring rarely-heard works by Sofia Gubaidulina, Shostakovich, and Mieczysław Weinberg, one of the most important recent re-discoveries and considered by many the third of the great Soviet composers, alongside Prokofiev and Shostakovich.

At last season’s Soluna Festival, under the auspices of the Dallas Symphony, the following was said of the group:  [Misha] “Vitenson is an aggressive violinist who generates a full sound and plays with laser focus, nearly perfect intonation and amazing accuracy.  A natural born leader, he probably would chaff in the second violin chair.  Klotz is probably the best violist you will ever hear.  He has a huge sound that can match the cello or the violin, depending on the texture of the music. His solo passages are stunning.  Calloway has his work cut out for him, playing in such an assertive quartet, but he always rises to the occasion. He offers a firm grounding, and is the underpinning for the remarkable intonation of the group.  However, he can soar above the fray when the music requires it.”  -Theater Jones

Their performance at the Kennedy Center’s Fortas Chamber Music Series at the Terrace Theater yielded the following comments from the Washington Post:  [“The Amernet’s performance of Beethoven op. 95] was buoyed by the pull of irresistible momentum even in the second movement, in which cellist Jason Calloway’s beautifully weighted falling scale proceeded with stately majesty.  You had a feeling that the four musicians had decided to throw care to the winds and just go for it.  The Amernet…has a whole fistful of recently written pieces in its repertoire, many of which the quartet commissioned.  But a concert of Haydn, Beethoven and Franck is not to be sneezed at…when played as well and with as much attention to style and proportion as this one was.  The group adopted a warm, woody tone for their reading of Haydn’s Quartet in F minor, Op. 20, No. 5, and a richly lush, almost orchestral delivery for the Franck Piano Quintet. [with Pianist James Tocco]. Their Haydn maintained an intimate, Baroque-like balance and transparency while their Franck ebbed and flowed in the indulgence of that work’s romanticism, and the players seemed equally at home in both of these very different idioms.

The Amernet’s performance schedule has taken the quartet across the Americas and to Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.  They have collaborated with many of today’s most prominent artists and ensembles including the Tokyo and Ying quartets as well as Shmuel Ashkenasi, Robert deMaine, Roberto Diaz, Gary Hoffman, Ida Kavafian, Anthony McGill, Sherrill Milnes and Michael Tree.

Internationally, the quartet has appeared at major festivals around the world, including Cervantino, San Miguel de Allende, Aviv (Israel), and Colima (Mexico), while in Germany a critic commented that their playing was “fascinating, with flawless intonation, extraordinary beauty of sound, virtuosic brilliance and homogeneity of ensemble.”  (Nürnberger Nachrichten).  The Amernet’s U.S. engagements have included the Kennedy Center, the Tilles Center, Caramoor, the Great Lakes Festival, Newport, Friends of Chamber Music in Arizona and Friends of Chamber Music in Syracuse, LPR in New York City, Chamber Music Society of Louisville, Music on the Edge in Pittsburgh, the University of Maine – Collins Center, and Market Square Concerts.  The Amernet has also appeared as quartet soloist with the Cincinnati Symphony and Alan Gilbert.  Earlier in their career, the Amernet won the gold medal at the Tokyo International Music Competition before being named first prize winners of the prestigious Banff International String Quartet Competition.

Prior to their current position at Florida International University, the Amernet held posts as Corbett String Quartet-in-Residence at Northern Kentucky University and at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.  Additionally, the ensemble served as the Ernst Stiefel Quartet-in-Residence at the Caramoor Center for the Arts.

In its frequent touring, the Amernet has conducted workshops and master classes in Buffalo, Los Angeles, Memphis, and New Orleans as well as visiting residencies at colleges and universities including Columbia, Gettysburg, Penn State, Princeton, Western Illinois, and Wiliams and abroad in Colombia, Israel, Mexico, and Serbia.  The Amernet String Quartet has received grants from the Corbett Foundation, the Greater Cincinnati Foundation, the LaSalle Foundation, the Fine Arts Fund, the Cincinnati Chamber Music Society, and the Amernet Society for school outreach projects, the commissioning of new chamber music works, and their concert and conversation series.  The group was the recipient of a Chamber Music Rural Residency Award during which they divided their time among the communities of Johnstown, Somerset, and Indiana, Pennsylvania.

The Amernet has always been committed to the music of our time, and now under the moniker AmerneXt, the Amernet is adopting some of the great works of the late 20th and 21st centuries in the context of earlier and traditional music.  Working closely with some of today’s leading composers, such as John Corigliano, Orlando Garcia, John Harbison, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Fredrick Kaufman, Bernard Rands, Gerhard Samuel, Morton Subotnick, Dmitri Tymoczko, and Chinary Ung, the group has taken on a new attitude, with music by Kurtag, Gubaidulina, Michael Gordon, and some of the fresh new voices of composers under 40.

For more information on the Amernet String Quartet click, HERE.

Miami Beach Urban Studios Open Mic #21

Open Mic #21

The Open Mic series is intended to provide a forum for self-expression to members of our community, to foster and nurture empowerment and self-esteem.

Occurring monthly in the Main Gallery, this is a safe zone for expression and sharing. You can pre-register to perform – any thing you’d like at the mic, be it Spoke Word/Poetry, Rap, Prose, Narrative, Monolog, Comedy, Song, Dance or other, all are welcome, encouraged, accepted and safe here. Pleas email Liane Sippin, Lsippin@fiu.edu.

Please come, join and support. Your presence is appreciated and honored, and genuinely lifts the spirit of our community.

For more on the work of Miami Beach Urban Studios Distinguished Affiliate Robert Zuckerman, please click here.

Miami Beach Urban Studios Open Public Rehearsal: Amernet String Quartet

Conservatory strings quartet shoot at my mom's house - Franz Fel

Open Public Rehearsal: Amernet String Quartet

Come visit the Urban Studios and listen to the Amernet string quartet practice 10:30am-1:30pm

Amernet is back with a new sound, a fresh approach and an irresistible energy!

The Amernet String Quartet has garnered recognition as one of today’s  exceptional string quartets and are Ensemble-in-Residence at Florida International University in Miami.  Their sound has been called “complex” but with an “old world flavor.” Strad Magazine described the Amernet as “…a group of exceptional technical ability.”

The Amernet is joined this season by second violinist Tomas Cotik and forges ahead with a newly formed sound with the release of a new CD called Dissenting Voices on New Focus Recordings featuring rarely-heard works by Sofia Gubaidulina, Shostakovich, and Mieczysław Weinberg, one of the most important recent re-discoveries and considered by many the third of the great Soviet composers, alongside Prokofiev and Shostakovich.

At last season’s Soluna Festival, under the auspices of the Dallas Symphony, the following was said of the group:  [Misha] “Vitenson is an aggressive violinist who generates a full sound and plays with laser focus, nearly perfect intonation and amazing accuracy.  A natural born leader, he probably would chaff in the second violin chair.  Klotz is probably the best violist you will ever hear.  He has a huge sound that can match the cello or the violin, depending on the texture of the music. His solo passages are stunning.  Calloway has his work cut out for him, playing in such an assertive quartet, but he always rises to the occasion. He offers a firm grounding, and is the underpinning for the remarkable intonation of the group.  However, he can soar above the fray when the music requires it.”  -Theater Jones

Their performance at the Kennedy Center’s Fortas Chamber Music Series at the Terrace Theater yielded the following comments from the Washington Post:  [“The Amernet’s performance of Beethoven op. 95] was buoyed by the pull of irresistible momentum even in the second movement, in which cellist Jason Calloway’s beautifully weighted falling scale proceeded with stately majesty.  You had a feeling that the four musicians had decided to throw care to the winds and just go for it.  The Amernet…has a whole fistful of recently written pieces in its repertoire, many of which the quartet commissioned.  But a concert of Haydn, Beethoven and Franck is not to be sneezed at…when played as well and with as much attention to style and proportion as this one was.  The group adopted a warm, woody tone for their reading of Haydn’s Quartet in F minor, Op. 20, No. 5, and a richly lush, almost orchestral delivery for the Franck Piano Quintet. [with Pianist James Tocco]. Their Haydn maintained an intimate, Baroque-like balance and transparency while their Franck ebbed and flowed in the indulgence of that work’s romanticism, and the players seemed equally at home in both of these very different idioms.

The Amernet’s performance schedule has taken the quartet across the Americas and to Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.  They have collaborated with many of today’s most prominent artists and ensembles including the Tokyo and Ying quartets as well as Shmuel Ashkenasi, Robert deMaine, Roberto Diaz, Gary Hoffman, Ida Kavafian, Anthony McGill, Sherrill Milnes and Michael Tree.

Internationally, the quartet has appeared at major festivals around the world, including Cervantino, San Miguel de Allende, Aviv (Israel), and Colima (Mexico), while in Germany a critic commented that their playing was “fascinating, with flawless intonation, extraordinary beauty of sound, virtuosic brilliance and homogeneity of ensemble.”  (Nürnberger Nachrichten).  The Amernet’s U.S. engagements have included the Kennedy Center, the Tilles Center, Caramoor, the Great Lakes Festival, Newport, Friends of Chamber Music in Arizona and Friends of Chamber Music in Syracuse, LPR in New York City, Chamber Music Society of Louisville, Music on the Edge in Pittsburgh, the University of Maine – Collins Center, and Market Square Concerts.  The Amernet has also appeared as quartet soloist with the Cincinnati Symphony and Alan Gilbert.  Earlier in their career, the Amernet won the gold medal at the Tokyo International Music Competition before being named first prize winners of the prestigious Banff International String Quartet Competition.

Prior to their current position at Florida International University, the Amernet held posts as Corbett String Quartet-in-Residence at Northern Kentucky University and at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.  Additionally, the ensemble served as the Ernst Stiefel Quartet-in-Residence at the Caramoor Center for the Arts.

In its frequent touring, the Amernet has conducted workshops and master classes in Buffalo, Los Angeles, Memphis, and New Orleans as well as visiting residencies at colleges and universities including Columbia, Gettysburg, Penn State, Princeton, Western Illinois, and Wiliams and abroad in Colombia, Israel, Mexico, and Serbia.  The Amernet String Quartet has received grants from the Corbett Foundation, the Greater Cincinnati Foundation, the LaSalle Foundation, the Fine Arts Fund, the Cincinnati Chamber Music Society, and the Amernet Society for school outreach projects, the commissioning of new chamber music works, and their concert and conversation series.  The group was the recipient of a Chamber Music Rural Residency Award during which they divided their time among the communities of Johnstown, Somerset, and Indiana, Pennsylvania.

The Amernet has always been committed to the music of our time, and now under the moniker AmerneXt, the Amernet is adopting some of the great works of the late 20th and 21st centuries in the context of earlier and traditional music.  Working closely with some of today’s leading composers, such as John Corigliano, Orlando Garcia, John Harbison, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Fredrick Kaufman, Bernard Rands, Gerhard Samuel, Morton Subotnick, Dmitri Tymoczko, and Chinary Ung, the group has taken on a new attitude, with music by Kurtag, Gubaidulina, Michael Gordon, and some of the fresh new voices of composers under 40.

For more information on the Amernet String Quartet click, HERE.

Miami Beach Urban Studios Main Gallery Exhibition: “A Priori” by Angelika Rinnhofer

A priori updated

“A Priori” by Angelika Rinnhofer

Exhibition: January 12-January 31, 2017

Opening Reception: January 12 at 7pm

German artist Angelika Rinnhofer, born in Nuremberg, Germany, grew up surrounded by the visual opulence of Catholic churches in Bavaria.  She spent church services in fearful awe, absorbing the images of tortured saints and martyrs that lined the walls.  It was an unforgettable experience that she now draws upon as an artist.  Trained as a photographer in Germany, Rinnhofer started posing people in bygone costumes, in postures, lighting, and composition inspired by the Old Masters.  Not tied to the visual language of just one painter or one period in time, the photographs nevertheless are heavily inspired especially by Albrecht Dürer, Michelangelo, and Caravaggio, by Mannerism and the Renaissance.

For “a priori”, artist Angelika Rinnhofer records narratives of individuals, whose attempts to make sense of memories, stories, and facts eventually led to the disclosure of their Jewish heritage. She takes photographs of her participants and interviews them about their discoveries.

With this project Rinnhofer sifts through the implications of her participants’ discoveries and tries to reveal the effect that anecdotes of trauma and separation have on one’s sense of self. The discovery of a family secret, often conceived out of necessity and passed on from generation to generation, carries the potential for revision and melioration. The effects of such revelations on her participants’ lives vary greatly, and Rinnhofer documents these disclosures and postulates their potential to transform.

As a German artist who immigrated to the US, Angelika Rinnhofer has been exploring her own transformation while adapting to life in America. The effect that her chosen community has had on her life and art, all the while considering her upbringing in another culture, has prompted questions based in sociological discourse. With “a priori”, with its catalyst in Germany’s history and its focus on Jewish identity, Rinnhofer explores the dynamics of communities and the role of the individual in their midst.

To learn more about Angelika click, here.

Miami Beach Urban Studios Open Public Rehearsal: Amernet String Quartet

Conservatory strings quartet shoot at my mom's house - Franz Fel

Open Public Rehearsal: Amernet String Quartet

Come visit the Urban Studios and listen to the Amernet string quartet practice 10:30am-1:30pm

Amernet is back with a new sound, a fresh approach and an irresistible energy!

The Amernet String Quartet has garnered recognition as one of today’s  exceptional string quartets and are Ensemble-in-Residence at Florida International University in Miami.  Their sound has been called “complex” but with an “old world flavor.” Strad Magazine described the Amernet as “…a group of exceptional technical ability.”

The Amernet is joined this season by second violinist Tomas Cotik and forges ahead with a newly formed sound with the release of a new CD called Dissenting Voices on New Focus Recordings featuring rarely-heard works by Sofia Gubaidulina, Shostakovich, and Mieczysław Weinberg, one of the most important recent re-discoveries and considered by many the third of the great Soviet composers, alongside Prokofiev and Shostakovich.

At last season’s Soluna Festival, under the auspices of the Dallas Symphony, the following was said of the group:  [Misha] “Vitenson is an aggressive violinist who generates a full sound and plays with laser focus, nearly perfect intonation and amazing accuracy.  A natural born leader, he probably would chaff in the second violin chair.  Klotz is probably the best violist you will ever hear.  He has a huge sound that can match the cello or the violin, depending on the texture of the music. His solo passages are stunning.  Calloway has his work cut out for him, playing in such an assertive quartet, but he always rises to the occasion. He offers a firm grounding, and is the underpinning for the remarkable intonation of the group.  However, he can soar above the fray when the music requires it.”  -Theater Jones

Their performance at the Kennedy Center’s Fortas Chamber Music Series at the Terrace Theater yielded the following comments from the Washington Post:  [“The Amernet’s performance of Beethoven op. 95] was buoyed by the pull of irresistible momentum even in the second movement, in which cellist Jason Calloway’s beautifully weighted falling scale proceeded with stately majesty.  You had a feeling that the four musicians had decided to throw care to the winds and just go for it.  The Amernet…has a whole fistful of recently written pieces in its repertoire, many of which the quartet commissioned.  But a concert of Haydn, Beethoven and Franck is not to be sneezed at…when played as well and with as much attention to style and proportion as this one was.  The group adopted a warm, woody tone for their reading of Haydn’s Quartet in F minor, Op. 20, No. 5, and a richly lush, almost orchestral delivery for the Franck Piano Quintet. [with Pianist James Tocco]. Their Haydn maintained an intimate, Baroque-like balance and transparency while their Franck ebbed and flowed in the indulgence of that work’s romanticism, and the players seemed equally at home in both of these very different idioms.

The Amernet’s performance schedule has taken the quartet across the Americas and to Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.  They have collaborated with many of today’s most prominent artists and ensembles including the Tokyo and Ying quartets as well as Shmuel Ashkenasi, Robert deMaine, Roberto Diaz, Gary Hoffman, Ida Kavafian, Anthony McGill, Sherrill Milnes and Michael Tree.

Internationally, the quartet has appeared at major festivals around the world, including Cervantino, San Miguel de Allende, Aviv (Israel), and Colima (Mexico), while in Germany a critic commented that their playing was “fascinating, with flawless intonation, extraordinary beauty of sound, virtuosic brilliance and homogeneity of ensemble.”  (Nürnberger Nachrichten).  The Amernet’s U.S. engagements have included the Kennedy Center, the Tilles Center, Caramoor, the Great Lakes Festival, Newport, Friends of Chamber Music in Arizona and Friends of Chamber Music in Syracuse, LPR in New York City, Chamber Music Society of Louisville, Music on the Edge in Pittsburgh, the University of Maine – Collins Center, and Market Square Concerts.  The Amernet has also appeared as quartet soloist with the Cincinnati Symphony and Alan Gilbert.  Earlier in their career, the Amernet won the gold medal at the Tokyo International Music Competition before being named first prize winners of the prestigious Banff International String Quartet Competition.

Prior to their current position at Florida International University, the Amernet held posts as Corbett String Quartet-in-Residence at Northern Kentucky University and at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music.  Additionally, the ensemble served as the Ernst Stiefel Quartet-in-Residence at the Caramoor Center for the Arts.

In its frequent touring, the Amernet has conducted workshops and master classes in Buffalo, Los Angeles, Memphis, and New Orleans as well as visiting residencies at colleges and universities including Columbia, Gettysburg, Penn State, Princeton, Western Illinois, and Wiliams and abroad in Colombia, Israel, Mexico, and Serbia.  The Amernet String Quartet has received grants from the Corbett Foundation, the Greater Cincinnati Foundation, the LaSalle Foundation, the Fine Arts Fund, the Cincinnati Chamber Music Society, and the Amernet Society for school outreach projects, the commissioning of new chamber music works, and their concert and conversation series.  The group was the recipient of a Chamber Music Rural Residency Award during which they divided their time among the communities of Johnstown, Somerset, and Indiana, Pennsylvania.

The Amernet has always been committed to the music of our time, and now under the moniker AmerneXt, the Amernet is adopting some of the great works of the late 20th and 21st centuries in the context of earlier and traditional music.  Working closely with some of today’s leading composers, such as John Corigliano, Orlando Garcia, John Harbison, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Fredrick Kaufman, Bernard Rands, Gerhard Samuel, Morton Subotnick, Dmitri Tymoczko, and Chinary Ung, the group has taken on a new attitude, with music by Kurtag, Gubaidulina, Michael Gordon, and some of the fresh new voices of composers under 40.

For more information on the Amernet String Quartet click, HERE.