Tag: SIPA

Discovering Your True Nature: A Quantum Magical Mystery Tour of You

Wolf Web
Dianne Collins and Alan K. Collins Distinguished Speaker Series
Program in the Study of Spirituality


Discovering Your True Nature

A Quantum Magical Mystery Tour of You

Lecture by Dr. Fred Alan Wolf, Ph.D. aka Dr. Quantum®

Thursday, February 23, 2017 | 7 PM | FIU Biscayne Bay Campus | Wolfe Theater

We are going on a Quantum Physical Magical Mystery Tour. Dr. Fred Alan Wolf will be your guide. The place we will explore is you. The audience will learn to recognize that the mind works by a quantum physical process of defocusing and focusing, which means learning how to let go of memories and learning how to focus in on possibilities. This practice of focusing and defocusing creates subjective time and makes time travel a necessary part of the way that your mind functions and the way time works. Throughout this presentation, Dr. Wolf will bring the audience to realize that an infinite, unchanging reality exists hidden behind the illusion of ceaseless change, lies at the core of every being and is the substratum of the personality. Moreover, that life has one main purpose: to experience this one reality—to discover God while one is living on earth, that there is only one mind and that your thoughts, as personal as they seem, have been thought everywhere by everyone in some form.

Dr. Fred Alan Wolf is a physicist, writer, and lecturer who earned his Ph.D. in theoretical physics at UCLA in 1963. He continues to write, lecture throughout the world, and conduct research on the relationship of quantum physics to consciousness. He is the National Book Award Winning author of Taking the Quantum Leap. He is a member of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Collegium of Scholars and has delved into the relationship between human consciousness, psychology, physiology, the mystical, and the spiritual. His investigations have taken him from intimate discussions with physicist David Bohm to the magical and mysterious jungles of Peru, from master classes with Nobel Laureate Richard Feynman to the high deserts of Mexico, from a significant meeting with Werner Heisenberg to the hot coals of a fire walk.

A light reception will precede the event. Books will be available for purchase and there will be a book signing following the event.

Event is free and open to the public.
A suggested donation of $20 allows us to continue presenting quality programming.

To RSVP, please click here.
For more information, please call 305-348-7266.

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Vice Provost for FIU Biscayne Bay Campus.

Documentary Screening and Book Signing: Finding Samuel Lowe. China, Jamaica, Harlem

MADISON

Documentary Screening and Book Signing featuring Paula Williams Madison. Sponsored by LACC. Co-sponsored by FIU’s African & African Diaspora Studies Program. Part of LACC’s Migrant and Transient Communities Program of Excellence. Free and open to the public. For more information, please call (305) 348-2894.

Opportunities and Challenges for the Transatlantic Economic Relationship

Levie Web

Ruth K. and Shepard Broad Distinguished Lecture Series

Opportunities and Challenges for the Transatlantic Economic Relationship

Presentation by Damien Levie, Head of Trade and Agriculture Section
Delegation of the European Union to the United States
Thursday, February 16, 2017 | 5 – 6:30 PM | FIU MMC | MARC Pavilion

Part of the Two-Day Conference on the Transatlantic Trade & Investment Partnership

Before coming to Washington, D.C., Damien Levie was a member of the Cabinet of EU Trade Commissioner Karel De Gucht from 2009 to 2012. He subsequently headed the U.S. and Canadian team of the Directorate General for Trade at the European Commission. During that period, he contributed to the pursuit of an ambitious EU trade policy agenda with the Americas, in particular the launch of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations between the U.S. and the EU, for which he was deputy chief negotiator.

Damien joined the European Commission in 2001, working on issues including merger control policy and REACH, the EU’s basic chemical regulation. From 2005 to 2009, he served in the cabinet of Louis Michel, EU Commissioner for Development and Humanitarian Aid. During that period, he worked on economic development policy in Africa as well as European economic integration issues.

Damien Levie has law degrees from KU Leuven and the University of Chicago Law School and an economics degree from UC Louvain. He was a lawyer at a major U.S. law firm in Brussels and New York from 1994 to 2001.

Damien was a member of the board of directors of the Kunstenfestivaldesarts and president of the Belgian Alumni Club of the University of Chicago.

Co-sponsored by the European and Eurasian Studies ProgramMiami-Florida Jean Monnet Center of Excellence

The European Center/Jean Monnet Chair, University of MiamiBritweek

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP by Feb. 10th to Christine I. Caly-Sanchez at calyc@fiu.edu
To RSVP please click here. For more information, call 305-348-5949.

Religion and the Holocaust in Contemporary Discourse

Berenbaum WEb

Holocaust Studies Initiative

Global Jewish Studies Program

Inaugural Suzanne R. and Dr. Lawrence M. Fishman Scholar-in-Residence
Dr. Michael Berenbaum, American Jewish University

Religion and the Holocaust in Contemporary Discourse

Tuesday, February 14, 2017 | 11 AM – 12:15 PM | FIU Modesto A. Maidique Campus | DM 100

In a world of relativism, the Holocaust has taken its place as the Negative Absolute. We don’t know what is good or bad. But we do know that the Holocaust is evil, absolute evil. People use the word to call attention to their suffering – the Black Holocaust, the Holocaust of the American Indians, the Holocaust in Kosovo, Rwanda, Bosnia. The Holocaust is the nuclear bomb of moral epithets. It is an event of such magnitude that the more we sense the relativism of values, the more we require the Holocaust as the foundation for a negative absolute. This may well be the reason why the leaders of European nations have rediscovered the importance of the Holocaust for contemporary moral education. It may also be why Holocaust deniers deny an event that all reason and rationality demonstrate cannot be denied. It is in this function as negative absolute that the Holocaust may loom largest in the coming years. Dr. Berenbaum’s lecture will probe what are appropriate and inappropriate invocations of the Holocaust and provide criteria by which to judge them.

 

Dr. Michael Berenbaum is a writer, lecturer, and teacher consulting in the conceptual development of museums and the development of historical films. He serves as the Director of the Sigi Ziering Institute: Exploring the Ethical and Religious Implications of the Holocaust and as a Professor of Jewish Studies at the American Jewish University. The author and editor of 20 books, scores of scholarly articles, and hundreds of journalistic pieces, he was also the Executive Editor of the Second Edition of the Encyclopaedia Judaica. He was project director overseeing the creation of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the first director of its Research Institute. He later served as president and CEO of the Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation created by Stephen Spielberg, which took the testimony of 52,000 Holocaust survivors in 32 languages and 57 countries and is now the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education. His work in flim has won Emmy and Academy Awards. 

 

The Suzanne R. and Dr. Lawrence M. Fishman Scholar-in-Residence program has been established as a multi-year commitment to promote the agenda of the FIU Holocaust Studies Initiative: to enhance Holocaust education through outreach to the entire South Florida region. To that end, the Fishman Scholar will engage the community annually with lectures at the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, on campus, and at a local Jewish day school.  This year’s school partner is Katz Yeshiva High School in Boca Raton.

 

This event is free and open to the public.  To RSVP, please click here.

For more information, please call 305-348-7266.

Was FDR as Bad for the Jews as Some Think He Was?

Berenbaum JMOF Web

Holocaust Studies Initiative

Global Jewish Studies Program

Inaugural Suzanne R. and Dr. Lawrence M. Fishman Scholar-in-Residence
Dr. Michael Berenbaum, American Jewish University

Was FDR as Bad for the Jews as Some Think He Was?

Sunday, February 12, 2017 | 2:00 PM | Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU | 301 Washington Ave., Miami Beach

Franklin Delano Roosevelt has not fared well among Holocaust scholars, and even worse among American Jews. Both Arthur Morse’s popular work While Six Million Died and David Wyman’s more scholarly study The Abandonment of the Jews hold the Roosevelt Administration and the president himself accountable for their inaction and indifference to the fate of the Jews. In this talk, 2017 Fishman Scholar Dr. Berenbaum explores the question anew. How are we to judge FDR? Was he a catastrophe and an anti-semite? Was he indispensable and heroic? Was he both?

 

Dr. Michael Berenbaum is a writer, lecturer, and teacher consulting in the conceptual development of museums and the development of historical films. He serves as the Director of the Sigi Ziering Institute: Exploring the Ethical and Religious Implications of the Holocaust and as a Professor of Jewish Studies at the American Jewish University. The author and editor of 20 books, scores of scholarly articles, and hundreds of journalistic pieces, he was also the Executive Editor of the Second Edition of the Encyclopaedia Judaica. He was project director overseeing the creation of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the first director of its Research Institute. He later served as president and CEO of the Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation created by Stephen Spielberg, which took the testimony of 52,000 Holocaust survivors in 32 languages and 57 countries and is now the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education. His work in flim has won Emmy and Academy Awards. 

 

The Suzanne R. and Dr. Lawrence M. Fishman Scholar-in-Residence program has been established as a multi-year commitment to promote the agenda of the FIU Holocaust Studies Initiative: to enhance Holocaust education through outreach to the entire South Florida region. To that end, the Fishman Scholar will engage the community annually with lectures at the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, on campus, and at a local Jewish day school.  This year’s school partner is Katz Yeshiva High School in Boca Raton.

 

Free for museum members and students with valid ID or with museum admission.

To RSVP, please call 786-972-3175 or e-mail info@jewishmuseum.com

Trump and the Iran Nuclear Deal

Luers Web

Middle East Studies Program

Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs

Trump and the Iran Nuclear Deal

Lecture by Ambassador William H. Luers, Director of the Iran Project

Thursday, February 9, 2017 | 3:30 PM | FIU Modesto A. Maidique Campus | GC 243

 

During the recent presidential campaign, Donald Trump often denounced the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action for being insufficiently tough and threatened to walk away from the agreement if elected.  Campaign rhetoric aside, what can or can’t Trump do with this important multilateral agreement. Join us as Ambassador William Luers contemplates the future of the Nuclear Deal and U.S.- Iran relations.

 

Ambassador William H. Luers is the Director of the Iran Project and an adjunct professor at Columbia University. He was President of the United Nations Association of the U.S. (1999-2009) and President of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (1986-1999.) Prior to his move to New York, Ambassador Luers had a 31-year career in the Foreign Service. He served as U.S. Ambassador to Czechoslovakia (1983-1986) and Venezuela, (1978-1982) and held numerous posts in Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union and in the U.S. Department of State.  Ambassador Luers has been an adjunct professor at several universities in addition to Columbia. He was also the director’s visitor at Princeton University’s Institute for Advanced Studies in 1982-1983. Born in Springfield, Illinois, Ambassador Luers received his B.A. from Hamilton College and his M.A. from Columbia University following four years in the U.S. Navy. He is an active member of the Council on Foreign Relations. 

 

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 305-348-7266.

 

Co-sponsored by the Initiative for Muslim World Studies, Václav Havel Program for Human Rights and Diplomacy and the Jack D. Gordon Institute for Public Policy.

Before Night Falls | Reflections on the Life of Reinaldo Arenas with Music from Jorge Martín’s Opera

Before Night Falls Web

Ruth K. & Shepard Broad Distinguished Lecture Series
Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs

Before Night Falls
Reflections on the Life of Reinaldo Arenas with Music from Jorge Martín’s Opera Before Night Falls

Sunday, February 5, 2017 | 3 PM | Coral Gables Congregational Church (Main Sanctuary) | 3010 de Soto Blvd, Coral Gables

Join the Florida Grand Opera and the Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs for a special presentation exploring the life and times of Cuban writer and dissident Reinaldo Arenas. The event will feature spoken narratives and music from the opera Before Night Falls by Cuban American composer Jorge Martín. Based on Arenas’ famous memoir, the opera follows his life from childhood poverty in the Cuban countryside to his emigration to the United States in the 1980 Mariel boatlift and his last decade in New York City. The work traces his trials and tribulations as a political prisoner disillusioned by the Cuban Revolution and persecuted by the Castro regime as a dissident writer and homosexual who was forced to smuggle his manuscripts abroad for publication. The opera premiered in 2010 to critical acclaim.

Featuring

Jorge Duany, Director, FIU Cuban Research Institute

Uva de Aragon, Author

Rich Denis, Heritage Program Director, Coming Out Cuba Foundation

Florida Grand Opera Young Artists

 

Sponsored by the Florida Grand Opera and supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Co-sponsored by the FIU Cuban Research Institute, FIU Department of Modern Languages, FIU Honors College, FIU Spanish & Mediterranean Studies Program, TotalBank Distinguished Speaker Series, Coral Gables Congregational Church and Coming Out Cuba Foundation.

This event is free and open to the public. To RSVP, please click here

For more information, please call 305-348-7266.

A Brief History of the Yellow Star

Stier Web
Holocaust Studies Initiative 
Global Jewish Studies Program
Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs
 

A Brief History of the Yellow Star

Lecture by Dr. Oren Baruch Stier, FIU

Tuesday, January 31, 2017 | 7 PM | Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU | 301 Washington Ave., Miami Beach

 

Arguably the most notorious article of Jewish clothing in history, the yellow star is widely acknowledged for its significant role in the Holocaust.  But what are its origins?  What were the experiences of those forced to wear it? Join Professor Stier on a far-ranging exploration of this infamous scrap of cloth.  Before the lecture, attendees are invited to tour the exhibition, “Stitching History from the Holocaust.”

 

Dr. Oren Baruch Stier is Professor of Religious Studies and Director of the Holocaust Studies Initiative at Florida International University. He is the author of two books, Holocaust Icons: Symbolizing the Shoah in History and Memory (Rutgers University Press, 2015) and Committed to Memory: Cultural Mediations of the Holocaust (University of Massachusetts Press, 2003) and co-editor of a third, Religion, Violence, Memory, and Place (Indiana University Press, 2006). A past recipient of a prestigious Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies Fellowship at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Stier has published articles in the Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Prooftexts, Jewish Social Studies, B’Or Ha’Torah, and Numen, among others.  Stier is currently working on his next book, Elie Wiesel’s Testament: Between Speech and Silence.

 

Part of FIU’s Holocaust and Genocide Awareness Week

 

Free for students with valid ID, $10 admission and $5 for museum members

To RSVP, please call 786-972-3175 or e-mail info@jewishmuseum.com

The Middle East: At the Center of the Refugee Crisis

Refugee Web

Middle East Studies Program

Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs

The Middle East: At the Center of the Refugee Crisis

Lecture by Mitra Ahmadinejad, FIU

Monday, January 30, 2017 | 1:00 PM | FIU Modesto A. Maidique Campus | PC 426

The world is witnessing the highest number of forcibly displaced populations in history. By the end of 2015, the population of forcibly displaced individuals rose to 65.3 million, meaning that one in every 113 humans worldwide was either a refugee, an internally displaced person (IDP), or an asylum seeker. Worldwide, conflicts and fear of persecution forced millions of individuals to abruptly escape in search of safety. Around 38 percent of conflicts that are categorized as critical and significant by the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) are ongoing in the Middle East. Join us as Mitra Ahmadinejad discusses this growing crisis in the Middle East and what can be done about it.

Mitra Ahmadinejad is a second year Ph.D. student and graduate assistant at FIU’s Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work (RSCPHSW.) Her research is focused on risk and resilience factors of refugees’ well-being. For over seven years, she worked with vulnerable populations, specifically refugees in Non Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and the United Nations (UN) in the Middle East and south Asia before joining the FIU graduate program in 2016.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, call 305-348-7266.

Co-sponsored by the Initiative for Muslim World Studies.

The Future of US Policy towards Latin America and the Caribbean

Future of U.S. Policy Towards Latin American and the Caribbean

Conversation by Congressman Eliot L. Engel, Ranking Member of the House of Foreign Affairs Committee. Sponsored by the Kimberly Green Latin American and Caribbean Center. Part of LACC’s Governance and Security Program of Excellence. Free and open to the public. For more information, please call (305) 348-2894.